Scooter Glossary

Do you know what "Concave" means? "SCS Compression"? , "Integrated Headset"?, "6061 T6"?, "Oversized"?
Pro scooters are made of parts with names that not all of us understand. We try to explain the most commonly heard terms from the scooter industry below. If you still have questions, please do not hesitate to contact us before placing your order. We will be glad to help you select the correct parts for your pro scooter.


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Glossary Index

  1. Scooter Jargon
    1. 4130, 6061 T6, 7075 aluminum, Forged, Heat Threated
    2. Anodized, Powder Coated
  2. Scooter Axles and Spacers
    1. Scooter Axle Styles
    2. Front Axle
    3. Rear Axle
  3. Scooter Bars
    1. Introduction
    2. Backsweep or Rake
    3. Gusset
    4. Slit
    5. Standard
    6. Oversized / HIC
    7. Aluminum
    8. Fluted
  4. Scooter Clamps
    1. Standard versus Oversized
    2. Shim
    3. Importance of Clamp Height
  5. Scooter Compression Systems
    1. Introduction
    2. ICS (Inverted Compression System)
    3. ICS Fork Steerer Length Recommendation
    4. HIC (Hidden Internal Compression System)
    5. HIC Shim Types
    6. HIC Fork Steerer Length Recommendation
    7. IHC (Integrated Headset Compression)
    8. Mini HIC
    9. SCS (Standard Compression System)
    10. SCS Clamp Height
    11. Pytel Compression
  6. Scooter Decks
    1. Head Tube and Neck
    2. Integrated versus Standard
    3. Width
    4. Length
    5. Foot Space
    6. Concave
    7. Dropouts
  7. Scooter Forks
    1. Introduction
    2. Threadless versus Threaded
    3. Compression Bolt Types
    4. Fork Crown Types
    5. Steerer Tube Lengths
  8. Scooter Headsets
    1. Introduction
    2. Parts by Type
  9. Scooter Pegs
    1. Front Peg
    2. Front Peg with Spacer
    3. Rear Peg
    4. Rear Peg with Spacer
  10. Scooter Wheels
    1. Introduction
    2. Bearings
    3. Bearing Spacer
    4. Bearing Spacer too wide
    5. Bearing Spacer too narrow

Scooter Jargon

Scooter Jargon / 4130, 6061 T6, 7075 aluminum, Forged, Heat Threated

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4130 is an alloy steel that is used to make most pro scooter bars and some scooter forks. It includes chromium and molybdenum, and this material is often referred to as chromoly steel (chrome-moly, cro-moly, CroMo, CRMO, CR-MOLY, and similar). It has an excellent strength to weight ratio. That means your pro scooter bar tubes can be made of a thinner material that is still stronger and harder than standard steel.

6061 refers to an aluminum alloy with magnesium and silicon, easy to machine and weld, and strong enough to be used on many pro scooter parts such as scooter decks, scooter forks scooter clamps and wheel hubs.  6061 can be welded, but looses strength around the welds. T6 refers to a level off heat treating that increases the strength of the alloy.

7075 (7000 series) refers to an aluminum alloy with zinc that is stronger than any 6061 aluminum alloy. A few pro scooter brands use 7000 series alloy, such as 5Starr (decks, forks) and Envy (Reaper bars).

The purpose of heat treating scooter parts is to change the mechanical properties to increase strength or restore strength after welding. Heat treated pro scooter parts are typically stronger.

Forging is pressing metal in a shape producing a piece that is stronger than an equivalent cast or machined pro scooter part. As the metal is shaped during the forging process, its internal grain deforms to follow the general shape of the part. As a result, the grain is continuous throughout the part, resulting in a pro scooter part with improved strength characteristics. We see forging used mostly on one-piece scooter Head Tube / Neck such as MGP and Fasen.

Scooter Jargon / Anodized, Powder Coated

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Anodizing is a process that forms a protective coating of aluminum oxide on the surface of aluminum pro scooter parts. It provides a deep metallic coating, that is hard, does not peel, and is unaffected by sunlight.

Powder coating is applied as a dry powder that is "baked" on the metal scooter part in an oven. The main difference between paint and a powder coating is that the powder coating does not require a solvent. Powder coating is used to create a hard finish on your pro scooter parts that is tougher than conventional paint.


Scooter Axles and Spacers

Scooter Axles and Spacers / Scooter Axle Styles

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Keywords: Glossary::Bolt Style , Button Style , scooter axle


100::Scooter Axle Styles

 

 

 

 

Most scooters have one of two styles of scooter axles:

Button Style axles are most common. They typically require just a #5 Allen wrench and provide a nice finished look. Disadvantage is that they are usually made of softer steel and they easily strip so the Allen wrench does not fit properly.

Bolt style axles are becoming more popular because they are made of hardened alloy steel and difficult to strip. They require a larger #6 Allen wrench and a Metric # 13 wrench or socket.

Scooter Axles and Spacers / Front Axle

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Keywords: axle length , front axle


110::Front Axle

 

 

 

 

When replacing the front axle on your pro scooter fork , you can use a Button style axle or a Bolt style axle. To determine how long the new front fork axle should be, simply measure the distance between the outside of fork drop outs (Original Width) and add 1/2 inch for a bolt style axle. If you plan to replace it with a button style axle, subtract 1/16 inch.

Please NOTE: Some forks have drop outs where the axle ends disappear inside the fork leg. Those forks are typically not suitable for Bolt Style axles and you may have to replace the axle with an original axle from the scooter brand you have.

Scooter Axles and Spacers / Rear Axle

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Keywords: axle length , rear axle


120::Rear Axle

 

 

 

 

When replacing the rear axle on your pro scooter fork , you can use a Button style axle or a Bolt style axle. To determine how long the new rear axle should be, simply measure the distance between the outside of deck drop outs (Original Width) and add 1/2 inch for a bolt style axle. If you plan to replace it with a button style axle, subtract 1/16 inch.


Scooter Bars

Scooter Bars / Introduction

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Keywords:


100::Introduction

Pro Scooter Bars consist of a straight down tube that runs vertically and is connected at the top to the cross bar that runs horizontally.

The slit refers to a cut , slot, or notch in the bottom of the down tube. The slit allows a clamp to “squeeze” the down tube around the top of the scooter fork, for a solid connection.

Scooter Bar height and bar width are personal preferences that can be different depending on the size of the rider, experience level, and the kind of tricks that the rider likes to do. These preferences develop over time. Here are some general guidelines:

We recommend that you refer to a current pro scooter to determine the size of your new bars.
HEIGHT: please measure from the bottom of the steering tube (where the clamp is) up to the top of the horizontal cross bar.

WIDTH; a good rule of thumb is to use AT LEAST your shoulder width. Most riders add a few inches to the shoulder width to increase control.

Most complete pro scooters come with bars that are 21-23 inches high, and 18-21 inches wide. This seems to be a safe range that will suit almost any entry level rider.

 

Scooter Bars / Backsweep or Rake

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Keywords: back sweep , backsweep , rake


200::Backsweep or Rake

 

 

 

 

 

Backsweep (AKA Rake) is the bending of the cross bar towards the pro scooter rider. Some riders, especially those that are used to riding BMX or MX are more comfortable with backsweep on their pro scooter bars. Depending on the manufacturer, backsweep can be between 2 and 5 degrees.


Keywords: gusset , gussets


300::Gusset

 

 

 

 

 

A gusset is a reinforcement that is welded in the corner where the cross bar and the down tube of the pro scooter bar connect. It is there to prevent the cross bar from bending in the corner. Gussets are especially useful when the cross bar is wide.


Keywords: slit


400::Slit

 

 

 

 

The slit allows a pro scooter clamp to “squeeze” the down tube around the top of the fork, for a solid connection. Bars used on threaded scooter forks, IHC compression, ICS compression, and HIC compression all need a slit. The importance of the size of slit is often overlooked. Because it allows the clamp to squeeze the down tube on the fork, the height of the slit needs to be at least as high as the clamp to be effective. Pro Scooter clamps come in various heights. If you already have a scooter clamp, please measure it before selecting the slit size. We recommend a slit size with all clamps we sell. See the specifications tab of the clamp description.

Only pro scooters with SCS compression require scooter bars with NO slit.


Keywords: standard bar , standard bars


500::Standard

 

 

 

 

Standard size pro scooter bars have a down tube with an inside diameter of 1 1/8 inch and an outside diameter of 1 1/4 inch (32mm). Most standard bars will fit on threaded forks, ICS, and ISC compression. However, some brands (APEX, Phoenix, Inward) use a thicker material for the down tube which means they do not work with ICS or IHC compression. These bars are often referred to as “SCS” bars. Standard pro scooter bars are always made from alloy steel.

Scooter Bars / Oversized / HIC

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Keywords: hic bar , oversized bar , oversized bars


600::Oversized / HIC

 

 

 

 

Oversized pro scooter bars or HIC bars have a down tube with an inside diameter of 1 1/4 inch and an outside diameter of 1 3/8 inch (35.9mm). They are designed to work with HIC compression but can also be used with SCS compression clamps that can fit a 1 3/8 inch down tube. Oversized pro scooter bars are always made from alloy steel.


Keywords: aluminum bar , aluminum bars


700::Aluminum

 

 

 

 

Aluminum pro scooter bars have a down tube with an inside diameter of 1 1/8 inch (just like a standard bar) and an outside diameter of 1 3/8 inch (34.9mm) (just like an oversized bar). They are designed to work with ICS, IHC, and SCS compression. If you are not sure if your scooter bar is made from steel or aluminum, hold a magnet to it, if it sticks, it is steel.


Keywords: fluted bar , fluted bars


800::Fluted

 

 

 

Fluting refers to refers to the shallow grooves running along a surface. For fluted pro scooter bars, this means weight can be saved while maintaining the original inside and outside diameter of the down tube, keeping them compatible with existing clamps and pro scooter forks.


Scooter Clamps

Scooter Clamps / Standard versus Oversized

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Keywords: oversized clamp , standard clamp


100::Standard versus Oversized

 

 

Freestyle pro scooter clamps come in 2 diameters. Standard and Oversized. Standard clamps fit on standard scooter bars with an outside diameter of 1 ¼”. Standard clamps do NOT fit on any aluminum pro scooter bars!

Oversized clamps fit on oversized (HIC) pro scooter bars with an outside diameter of 1 3/8” AND on Aluminum bars with that same outside diameter. (some aluminum bars made by Grit or Razor may be exceptions)

Some scooter clamps come with a shim that can be removed to fit oversized and aluminum scooter bars with an outside diameter of 1 3/8”.


 


Keywords: shim


200::Shim

 

 

Examples of shims found on pro scooters.

 

Scooter Clamps / Importance of Clamp Height

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Keywords: clamp height , height of the clamp


300::Importance of Clamp Height

 

 

In addition to different inside diameters, pro scooter clamps also come in different heights. The height of the clamp is important because it needs to correspond with the size if the slit in your pro scooter bar. The function of the clamp is to “squeeze” the down tube of the scooter bar on to the steerer tube of the fork. If the slit is shorter than the height of the clamp, the top of the clamp is unable to squeeze the bar and the result may be that your scooter bar keeps coming loose.

 


Scooter Compression Systems

Scooter Compression Systems / Introduction

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Keywords: compression , compression set , compression system


100::Introduction

There are 4 fundamentally different types of compression for pro scooters;

Inverted Compression System (ISC),

Standard Compression System (SCS), and

Hidden Internal Compression System (HIC).

Pytel Compression.

Variation of HIC, named Integrated Headset Compression (IHC) and mini HIC are also commonly used on pro scooters.

Each system is explained in further detail below.

Scooter Compression Systems / ICS (Inverted Compression System)

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Keywords: ICS , ICS bolt , ICS compression


200::ICS (Inverted Compression System)

 

 

ICS compression works with an inverted compression bolt that runs up through the steerer tube of the pro scooter fork and screws into a star nut that is pressed inside the down tube of the pro scooter bar.

ICS is the lightest and lowest cost scooter compression available, but it is also the weakest. It will require frequent adjustments and the risk of stripping the threads of the star nut is real. It also requires removal of the front scooter wheel for installation or making adjustments.

ICS compression ONLY works with standard size pro scooter bars or aluminum bars and requires a slit in the bar as well as a special tool to install the star nut inside the fork down tube.

Scooter Compression Systems / ICS Fork Steerer Length Recommendation

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Keywords:


300::ICS Fork Steerer Length Recommendation

 

 

Pro Scooter Decks from different brands come with different head tube lengths. Scooter Forks from different brands come with different steerer tube lengths. This means that not every fork will fit well on every deck with ICS compression.

We recommend that the fork steerer tube has a minimum length of 1 1/2" and maximum of 2” above the headset for ICS. The maximum is due to the fact that the star nut is typically 2.5” deep inside the pro scooter bar down tube.

Scooter Compression Systems / HIC (Hidden Internal Compression System)

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Keywords: HIC , HIC compression


400::HIC (Hidden Internal Compression System)

 

 

HIC compression is designed to work with oversized pro scooter bars with slit ONLY.

It works with a shim shim with an outside diameter of 1 1/4” that slides over the scooter fork steerer tube and is compressed on the headset with a compression bolt or threaded screw cap.

HIC is low cost, but because of the oversized bar and oversized pro scooter clamp it is more expensive and heavier than ICS.

In our opinion, HIC provides the best bang for the buck.

Scooter Compression Systems / HIC Shim Types

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Keywords: HIC shim , HIC shims


500::HIC Shim Types

 

 

There are different types of HIC compression shims for pro scooters.

The screw cap usually comes with the scooter fork.

The integrated cap system is common on Lucky and 5Starr scooters.

Scooter Compression Systems / HIC Fork Steerer Length Recommendation

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Keywords:


600::HIC Fork Steerer Length Recommendation

 

 

Pro Scooter Decks from different brands come with different head tube lengths. Scooter Forks from different brands come with different steerer tube lengths. This means that not every fork will fit well on every deck with HIC compression.

We recommend that the fork steerer tube has a minimum length of 1.75 ” above the headset with no maximum for HIC (* Except when using a integrated cap HIC shim, then the maximum is usually 1 7/8”). Some HIC shims are over 3” tall, which allows for a tall clamp with a lot of clamping power and a very solid pro scooter.

Scooter Compression Systems / IHC (Integrated Headset Compression)

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Keywords: IHC , IHC compression


700::IHC (Integrated Headset Compression)

 

 

IHC works just like HIC except IHC is designed to work with standard pro scooter bars (excluding Phoenix and APEX) with slit ONLY and it requires an integrated headset.

It works with a shim with an outside diameter of 1 1/8” that slides over the scooter fork steerer tube and is compressed on the headset with a threaded screw cap. IHC requires a special compression- or pinch ring for your integrated headset.

IHC is light weight, inexpensive and usually sold as a complete set with a special IHC pro scooter fork and the special headset compression- or pinch ring.

Scooter Compression Systems / Mini HIC

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Keywords: Glossary:: Mini HIC Compression , Glossary::Mini HIC


750::Mini HIC

 

 

Mini HIC works just like HIC except it is designed to work with standard pro scooter bars  with slit ONLY and it does not require an integrated headset. It is found almost exclusively on 2015 Phoenix Session, GRIT and Crisp scooters.

Like IHC, It works with a shim with an outside diameter of 1 1/8” that slides over the scooter fork steerer tube and is compressed on the headset with a threaded screw cap. Mini HIC requires a special compression- or pinch ring for your standard headset.

Mini HIC is light weight, inexpensive and usually sold as a complete set with a special pro scooter fork and the special headset compression- or pinch ring.

Scooter Compression Systems / SCS (Standard Compression System)

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Keywords: SCS , SCS compression


800::SCS (Standard Compression System)

 

 

SCS (Standard Compression System) is invented and patented by Proto. It is considered a superior pro scooter compression system.

It is a combination of a compression system AND a clamp. The bottom half of the SCS clamp slides over the steerer tube of the scooter fork. The down tube of the bar slides into the top half. A compression bolt screws into the top of the fork.

The reason this system is superior is that no slit is needed in the pro scooter bar, eliminating a weak area that sometimes causes the scooter bar to break.

Some SCS clamps can only take standard size scooter bars with an outside diameter of 1 ¼”. Others come with a shim that can be removed to fit oversized and aluminum pro scooter bars with an outside diameter of 1 3/8”.

Scooter Compression Systems / SCS Clamp Height

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Keywords:


825::SCS Clamp Height

 

 

SCS pro scooter clamps come in 2 heights: 3” and 4”. 3" clamps are sometimes referred to as "Baby SCS"

Which one you choose depends on the pro scooter fork, headset, and the scooter deck that you have.

Scooter Compression Systems / Pytel Compression

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Keywords: pytel , Pytel compression


850::Pytel Compression

 

 

Pytel compression appeared for the first time in 2015 on District complete pro scooters.

It is a combination of a compression system AND a clamp. The bottom third of the clamp can move up and down along a conical surface. The clamp is moved as far down on the bar as possible; then the top 2 bolts are tightened. When the bottom bolt is tightened, the bottom part of the clamp moves down and pressed on the top of the headset.

The District Pytel clamp only works with aluminum scooter bars with an outside diameter of 1 3/8” and require a 2" slit in the bar.


Scooter Decks

Scooter Decks / Head Tube and Neck

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Keywords: head tube , head tube angle , head tube length , neck


100::Head Tube and Neck

 

 

The head tube of your pro scooter is connected to the scooter deck with the neck. There are two important measurements related to the scooter head tube:

The head tube angle determines how steep your bar will be on the pro scooter; the larger the head tube angle, the steeper the bar. A steeper bar makes the scooter feel more roomy because the bar is farther away from the rider. It also makes the scooter steering more direct. Most pro scooter decks have a head tube angle of around 82-83 degrees.

The Head Tube Length is important because it determines the compatibility with scooter forks and compression systems. Most pro scooter decks have a length of about 4 inches. Brands like MGP, Ethic and some Sacrifice have shorter head tubes. Lucky and District typically have longer head tubes.

 

Scooter Decks / Integrated versus Standard

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Keywords: integrated deck , integrated head tube , integrated scooter deck , standard deck , standard head tube , standard scooter deck


200::Integrated versus Standard

 

 

Standard pro scooter decks are for standard/conventional threaded or threadless scooter headsets with headset cups pressed in the head tube using a headset press. The cups are easily recognizable as they will have a different color and texture then the head tube. Standard pro scooter decks are compatible with both threaded and threadless scooter forks.

Integrated pro scooter decks have headset cups integrated in the head tube and have the same color and texture. This makes it easy to install the scooter headset without special tools. Integrated pro scooter decks are ONLY compatible with threadless scooter forks.

 


Keywords: deck width


300::Width

 

 

The width of the pro scooter deck is important to feel comfortable riding your freestyle scooter. Riders with larger feet prefer wider scooter decks. Deck width ranges from 4” to 5.25 inch. Most pro scooter decks are between 4.25 and 4.5 inch wide.

 

 


Keywords: deck length


400::Length

 

 

The length of the pro scooter deck is important for the stability of the freestyle scooter. Street riders typically prefer longer decks for a more stable ride over a distance. Park riders tend to prefer shorter, more nimble scooter decks. Deck length ranges from 19.5 to 22 inch. Most pro scooter decks are between 20 and 21 inches long.

 

 

Scooter Decks / Foot Space

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Keywords: foot space , footspace


500::Foot Space

 

 

Foot Space is the space between the bottom of the neck and the scooter brake. Foot Space is important to feel comfortable riding your freestyle pro scooter. Riders with larger feet prefer scooter decks with more foot space. Foot space ranges from 13 to 15 inch. Most pro scooter decks have foot space of about 14 inches.

 

 


Keywords: concave , concaved


600::Concave

 

 

Concaved pro scooter decks provide more grip for the feet while riding your freestyle scooter and reduce the risk of slipping off. The combination of fresh grip tape and a concaved scooter deck makes you feel more confident when attempting tricks.

 

 

 


Keywords: drop outs , dropout , dropouts


700::Dropouts

 

 

Dropouts is a term from the bicycle industry referring to the back part of the pro scooter deck where the rear axle holds the rear scooter wheel onto the deck. To hold the wheel in the center between the drop outs, most scooter decks require wheel spacers between the wheel and the drop out.

 

 

 


Scooter Forks

Scooter Forks / Introduction

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Keywords: fork crown , offset , steerer tube , zero offset


100::Introduction

 

Steerer Tube

The steerer tube is the part of the pro scooter fork that holds the scooter bar at the top. Almost all freestyle scooters have a 1 1/8" diameter steerer tube. The length of the tube can vary among scooter brands and determines compatibility between pro scooter fork and deck!

Fork Crown

The scooter fork crown is at the bottom of the steerer tube. It holds the "crown race", which is the bottom most part of the headset.

Zero Offset

With Zero Offset, your wheel is directly under the steering column. That means it is easier to do bar spins, nosies and "hang fives".

Scooter Forks / Threadless versus Threaded

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Keywords: threaded fork , threaded forks , threadless fork , threadless forks


200::Threadless versus Threaded

 

 

Threadless Fork

Threadless pro scooter forks are popular among all riders. They have a smooth steerer tube and tend to be stronger and lighter than threaded forks. They require a threadless scooter headset and a compression system resulting in a more solid, or "dialed" pro scooter.

 

Threaded Fork

Threaded pro scooter forks are found on less expensive scooters. They have threads on the top of the steerer tube and are less desirable because they require threaded pro scooter headsets. Threaded headsets are more difficult to maintain and are usually not sealed. The selection of threaded headsets for pro scooters is limited.

Scooter Forks / Compression Bolt Types

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Keywords: compression bolt , compression cap


300::Compression Bolt Types

 

 

 

Threadless pro scooter forks are called threadless only because they do not have any threads on the outside of the steerer tube. In reality, almost every “threadless” fork needs threads to make a compression system work.

Most threadless pro scooter forks have threads at the top on the inside of the steerer tube. If they do not, threads can be added by installing a star nut inside the steerer tube.

Various types of compression bolts and bolt/caps are shown in the picture.

ICS pro scooter forks are sometimes truly “threadless”. Yet a threaded bolt is used to provide compression.

See compression chapter in this glossary for more information on pro scooter compression systems.

Scooter Forks / Fork Crown Types

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Keywords: fork crown , integrated crown race


400::Fork Crown Types

 

 

 

Pro Scooter fork Crowns are at the bottom of the fork steerer tube and provide a “seat” for the headset crown race. This crown race typically needs to be pressed on the fork crown, which requires a special tool to do it properly.

Removing the headset crown race can also be very difficult.

To make the headset crown race redundant, some pro scooter forks have one that is integrated with the fork crown. This makes installing your fork a lot easier. The disadvantage is that these forks are only suitable for integrated threadless headsets.

Scooter Forks / Steerer Tube Lengths

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Keywords: steerer tube length


600::Steerer Tube Lengths

 

 

 

 

Forks with different steerer tube lengths

Pro Scooter Forks from different brands come with different steerer tube lengths. Scooter Decks from different brands come with different head tube lengths. This means that, depending on your compression system,  not every fork will fit well on every pro scooter deck.


Scooter Headsets

Scooter Headsets / Introduction

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Keywords: conventional headset , integrated headset , standard headset , threaded headset , threadless headset


100::Introduction

 

 

Pro Scooter headsets come in two categories. Conventional or Standard headsets with cups that need to be pressed in the head tube using a headset press.

Conventional scooter headsets are available for both threaded and threadless forks. Entry level scooters sold for less that $150 likely have threaded headsets.

More advanced pro scooters will have conventional threadless or integrated headsets with cups as part of the head tube.

Integrated headsets are strictly for threadless forks! Your scooter deck’s head tube will determine what kind of headset will fit.

See chapter on Pro scooter Decks in this glossary for more information.

Scooter Headsets / Parts by Type

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Keywords: bearing cup , compression ring , crown race , dust cap , headset cup , lock nut , locknut , pinch ring , threaded race


200::Parts by Type

Regardless of headset type, pro scooter headsets all have:

  • Crown race
  • Bottom bearing
  • Top bearing
  • Dust Cap

Standard/conventional scooter headsets have bottom and top bearing cups to hold the bearings in place. These cups need to be pressed into the head tube of the pro scooter deck with a headset press.

Threadless headsets have a pinch ring or compression ring that is squeezed around the pro scooter fork by a separate compression system.

Threaded headsets do not have a pinch ring (AKA compression ring). Compression is accomplished by the dust cap (aka threaded race), which is screwed on the scooter fork, and locked in place by the lock nut.

Integrated headsets do not have cups at all, they are integrated in the head tube of the pro scooter deck.


Scooter Pegs

Scooter Pegs / Front Peg

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Keywords: front peg , front peg axle


100::Front Peg

 

 

 

 

When installing pegs on your pro scooter fork , the original front axle will most likely need to be replaced by a longer one.

To determine how long the new scooter fork axle should be, simply measure the distance between the outside of fork drop outs and add 1 inch. If you plan to install a second peg, add another half inch. (1.5” total).

Please NOTE: Some pro scooter forks have drop outs that are not designed with pegs in mind. See next picture how you can install pegs on these types of scooter forks.

Scooter Pegs / Front Peg with Spacer

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Keywords: front peg , front peg axle , peg , peg axle


200::Front Peg with Spacer

 

 

 

 

Some pro scooter forks are not designed with pegs in mind. When installing pegs on such a pro scooter fork , the original rear axle will most likely need to be replaced by a longer one AND a spacer needs to be installed between the peg and the drop out.

To determine how long the new pro scooter fork axle should be, simply measure the distance between the outside of drop outs and add 1.5 inch. If you plan to install a second scooter peg, add another half inch. (2 ” total).


Keywords: rear peg , rear peg axle


300::Rear Peg

 

 

 

 

When installing pegs on your pro scooter deck, the original rear axle will most likely need to be replaced by a longer one.

To determine how long the new rear axle should be, simply measure the distance between the outside of drop outs and add 1 inch. If you plan to install a second peg, add another half inch. (1.5” total).

Please NOTE: Some decks have drop outs that are not as neatly cut out as the one in the picture. See next picture how you can install pegs on these types of pro scooter decks.

Scooter Pegs / Rear Peg with Spacer

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Keywords:


400::Rear Peg with Spacer

 

 

 

 

Some pro scooter decks are not designed with pegs in mind. When installing pegs on such a pro scooter deck , the original rear axle will most likely need to be replaced by a longer one AND a spacer needs to be installed between the peg and the drop out.

To determine how long the new rear axle should be, simply measure the distance between the outside of drop outs and add 1.5 inch. If you plan to install a second pro scooter peg, add another half inch. (2 ” total).


Scooter Wheels

Scooter Wheels / Introduction

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Keywords: 100mm , 110mm , 120mm , 125mm , durometer , hub , metal core , metalcore , urethane


100::Introduction

 

 

Most pro scooter wheels come in two different diameters: 100mm,110mm. Some scooters now have wheels as large as 120mm or 125mm.

A larger scooter wheel will ride over obstacles such as rocks or cracks easier. The same obstacle hit by a smaller wheel will hit more in the front of the wheel, pushing it back. That is why larger wheels are faster and safer.


All pro scooter wheels have a solid "tire" made of Urethane. The hardness of the Urethane is indicated by the Durometer. For example "88A". The higher the Durometer, the harder the Urethane. Softer Urethane gives the pro scooter wheel more grip. Harder Urethane provides more speed.

More rebound lowers the rolling resistance, making the wheel faster and allowing it to carry more energy. When weight is put on a wheel it flattens on the bottom. As the scooter wheel rotates the urethane compresses when underneath and expands again as it rises. This compression requires energy and causes rolling resistance which slows the wheel.

 


Keywords: abec , wheel bearings


200::Bearings

 

 

Pro Scooter wheel bearings allow for the smooth rolling motion of a wheel on it's axle with minimal friction. They consist of 6, 7 or 8 ball bearings enclosed between an outer- and inner race. The ball bearings are kept in equal distance from each other by a retainer or cage. They are protected by two shields or seals. Two bearings, 1 on each side, are pressed into the scooter wheel separated by a bearing spacer. Industry standard pro scooter wheel bearings are identical to skateboard bearings size, except for dirt scooters.

Bearings rated under the ABEC (Annual Bearing Evaluation Committee) system are called "precision bearings”. They are rated with a number from 1 to 9, with the higher number assigned to scooter bearings manufactured against a higher standard of precision (high number = tighter tolerances = more expensive bearing). This does NOT mean that pro scooter bearings without a rating are bad!

 

Scooter Wheels / Bearing Spacer

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Keywords: bearing spacer


300::Bearing Spacer

 

 

The importance of the bearing spacer inside the pro scooter wheel in between the bearings is often overlooked. Having the correct spacer is critical the smoothness of your ride, the life of the bearings, and having a “dialed” scooter.

Most wheels will work well with a 10mm bearing spacer. Some manufacturers however will recommend a specific bearing spacer size as shown in the picture. Whatever you do, NEVER ride with out a bearing spacer. When in doubt, we recommend the Proto spacer.

Original bearing spacers in many pro scooter wheels are made of thin aluminum. These spacers can easily be squeezed and “mushroomed” when tightening your axles, effectively making them too narrow. We recommend you replace aluminum bearing spacers with steel ones.

 

Scooter Wheels / Bearing Spacer too wide

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400::Bearing Spacer too wide

 

 

If the bearing spacer is too wide, and you press the bearing into the pro scooter wheel, you are squeezing the outer race inward inside the wheel while the inner race has outward pressure from the spacer. This causes unnecessary friction and will make your wheel slower, and reduce the life of the bearings or even completely break them. Symptoms are slow spinning wheels and/or broken pro scooter bearings.

 

Scooter Wheels / Bearing Spacer too narrow

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500::Bearing Spacer too narrow

 

 

If you have no bearing spacer in your scooter wheel at all, or a spacer that is too narrow and you tighten your axle, you are pressing the inner race of the bearings inward into the pro scooter wheel while the outer race stays in place. This causes unnecessary friction and will make your wheel slower, and reduce the life of the bearings or even completely break them. Symptoms are slow spinning pro scooter wheels, broken bearings, and/or axles that need to be tightened over and over again. Another unwanted side effect is that you are also squeezing the drop outs of your pro scooter fork or deck together, which may result in your brake or wheel (if it has a proper bearing spacer) not fitting any more.